Use of activity-oriented questions in qualitative focus group discussions to explore youth violence in Sindh, Pakistan

  • Hussain Maqbool Ahmed Khuwaja School of Nursing and Midwifery, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
  • Rozina Karmaliani School of Nursing and Midwifery, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan
  • Judith McFarlane College of Nursing, Texas Woman’s University, Texas, United States
  • Rachel Jewkes South African Medical Research Council, Gender & Health Research Unit, Pretoria, South Africa
Keywords:
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Abstract

This paper reports the use of activity-oriented focus group discussions in a study that aimed to explore perceptions of youth violence among school-age adolescents of grade 6 to 8 in Pakistan. To engage students in active participation during focus group discussions, questions were asked in the form of activities like free listing, ranking, role-playing, and drawing. This paper explains how activity-oriented methods can help in the process of asking questions and retrieving information from adolescents to best energize the participants for optimum information. Furthermore, we explain the method of merging data from the activity-oriented questions for analysis and optimum understanding of participants’ perspectives.

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Published
2019-10-01
How to Cite
1.
Khuwaja H, Karmaliani R, McFarlane J, Jewkes R. Use of activity-oriented questions in qualitative focus group discussions to explore youth violence in Sindh, Pakistan. NPT. 6(4):162-166.
Section
Editorial(s)